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Ten Questions to Ask at a Historic Site adapted from Dr. James Loewen

1. When did this location became a historic site? (When was the marker or monument put up? Or the house interpreted?) How did that time differ from ours from the time of the event or person commemorated?

2. Who sponsored it? What participant group's point of view was represented? What was this group's position in social structure when the event occurred? When was the site established?

3. What were their ideological needs and the social purposes? What were their values?

4. Who is the intended audience for the site? What values were they trying to leave for us, today? What does the site ask us to go and do or think about?

5. Did the sponsors have government support? At what level?

6. Who is left out? How would the story differ if a different group sponsored the historic site? Another political party? Race? Sex? Class? Religious group?

7. Are there problematic words or symbols that would not be used today, or by other groups?

8. How is the site used today? Do traditional rituals continue to connect today's public to it? Or it is ignored? Why?

9. Is the presentation accurate? What actually happened? What historical sources tell of the event, people, or period commemorated at the site?

10. How does this site fit in with others that treat the same era? Or subject? What other people lived and events happened then but are not commemorated? Why?

Source: Prof. James Loewen, University of Vermont

If you need information about the UB-TAH the address is: 

UB-TAH, USU Uintah Basin Extension
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E-Mail: Antonio Arce, Project Coordinator
Phone: (435) 722-1736

If you would like to collaborate in the development of this site and be an important part of the Uintah Basin Teaching American History Project (UB-TAH,) please contact us or call us (435) 722-1736

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